Silver Fox – The Unkut Interview

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Sometimes there’s more to being a legendary rapper than classic records. You might have heard Silver Fox on one of the three 12” singles he released as part of the Fantasy Three, but his legacy runs a lot deeper than a mere mid-80’s footnote. Having established a reputation as formidable MC through battling at parties and clubs all over New York, this Grant Houses resident from Harlem would soon go on to mentor two of hip-hop’s greatest lyricists – LL Cool J and Kool G Rap. Considering that the lyrical techniques Fox passed onto Kool G Rap were adopted by everyone from Big Daddy Kane, Big L to Nas, it’s clear that his influence is still being felt to this day.

Robbie: How old were you when you started writing rhymes?

Silver Fox: I was an old head – I was 21 years-old. When I started, the only people older than me were Melle Mel and them. I had went to Alaska in ’75, when hip-hop had already started – but I wasn’t really into it then. I was into the Funk era – Brass Construction, BT Express. When I came back, I went back to the projects where I grew-up at. Then I see these guys out here with these turntables and this music and stuff, and they were swiping the electricity from the lamp posts. I was like, ‘Man, what are these guys doing?’ It was amazing to me. So I came out there and I listened to ‘em, then I went to the crib, wrote a rhyme down and I came down the next day like, ‘Yeah! I got it!’ And it was butt! I mean my rap was pure garbage! I made some ol’ Mickey Mouse rhyme – and I mean that literally! My brother snatched me off the stage like he was saving my life – like somebody was throwing a bomb at me or something. He grabbed me, ‘Nooooooo!’ He literally took me off of there. My brother Wes, he took me in the staircase and he’s like, ‘Man, I don’t know what you was doin’, man – but that’s not it! That was garbage.’ I was like, ‘Well, OK. How is it done then? What you think I should be doing?’ One of them type of numbers, right? So then he started bangin’ on the staircase, going, ‘Boom-bap! Ba-boom, boom-bap!’ And he started going, ‘The W-E the S-S-U and when I be on the mic I play it real cool/They call me Wessu, so I’m tellin’ the tale – the bad, bad brother that likes to throw down!’ I was like, ‘I’m the R-E double G-I-E…’ At first I was calling myself Reggie Reg, but then I found out that somebody else name was Reggie Reg. There was three of ‘em. So now I had to think of another thing. There was a thing for the Audi ‘Fox’, and it was the silver edition, and they called it the Silver Fox! I said, ‘Oh man! That is bad! I like that, man’. So now I was Silver Fox. Now I’m writing, I’m spending all my time writing and writing and memorizing. I got this crazy memory, man – things just stay up in my head, like books and stuff – so all these rhymes, I just started memorizing.

So how did things develop from there?

I had a big reputation as far as street rhymes. I was just all through the street before I even made records. I was goin’ everywhere, rappin’. I had a after hours spot that I’d go through – it was called Joe Grants. That’s where I would actually perfect my skills, ‘cos they let me get on there every week. So every week I’m writing new stuff and I’m trying it out on the crowd. Mostly I would try to battle people. I was looking for Moe Dee, but he didn’t want to see me! [laughs] I was basically a renegade – I was a rogue with my stuff. I’d just go places and jump on they mics and I hit it and I’m out! A lot of these guys like Moe and ‘em, they were from around my block. I grew-up on 125th Street and Amsterdam in New York. The Fearless Four – they’re from around my area. Doug E. Fresh is from 126th Street, Moe Dee is from 129th Street, so we were all close to each other. My thing was, in order for me to get on the map I gotta find out who’s good and take ‘em put! I gotta battle somebody so they can know who I am. I’m known by MC’s – all the rappers know me and they know what I do. When they guys were recording I was still out there trying to get a name for himself.

I used to go to the projects in Manhattan ‘cos there’s thousands of people living on a block, and in each of these neighborhoods there’s somebody’s who’s the best in that hood. So I’m like, ‘OK, I want to battle him!’ I go to clubs or I go to their spots – I was a crazy guy in my younger days, man. I’d be smoking weed, I’d be drinking brew, and a lot of the times when I went to these places I didn’t know who these cats was – all I knew was I was ready to battle. There was a lotta cats that knew about me already, before I got there. I would be in a dark spot, leaning against the wall – listening to ‘em, lookin’ at ‘em – sizing them up. Going, ‘Yeah, I could take them’. A lotta cats that I battled – they ripped their rhyme books up and go start writing some more. I had no mercy. And then I started to shake hands with guys [afterwards], ‘cos I’m thinking, ‘C’mon man, it’s alright. I’ll tell you what you did wrong!’ So now I got people that know me, that be like, ‘Yo, Silver Fox? That’s my dude, man. I remember when we hung-out one night.’ Now this guy is talking about, in my lifetime, this cat is talking about one night that he hung out with me. I will break bread with rappers – I’ll sit down and share a sub with you. But I do that and it’s, ‘Yo man, Fox is alright, man. I remember that time, man, I was hangin’ out with him, man. We battled, and then we sat down and we had a sub, man! And some chicken! And he said such-and-such to this girl!’ I’m like, ‘How I am I to remember all of that?’

Were you rolling with a crew to all these spots?

Nah, I did a lotta stuff by myself. But I had this one guy with me who called himself Kev-Ski. He was part of the hip-hop scene since the real old school with guys like [DJ] Hollywood and Eddie Cheeba. He knew the places to go to where the MC’s were at, ‘cos I didn’t know.

But weren’t you ever worried that if you step into someone’s party and humiliate the MC’s there that someone might try to jump you?

Nah, ‘cos I was more diplomatic with it. I didn’t go there looking battle people – I went there to get on the mic and let people hear my stuff. But then these cats would creep out the wood-work and try to diss me! Guys would be telling me that someone had said, ‘Silver Fox ain’t nuttin’! Let him come around here – I’ll battle him! I’ll tear that kid up!’ Then here go my boy, my good ‘ol buddy, ‘Yo Fox, KG said he wanna battle you. KG said you ain’t shit! He said he wished you would come around his way!’ ‘Oh yeah? Where KG live at?’ ‘He’s gonna be at this party around the way…’ I just wanted to go anywhere and be recognized as an MC, like these other guys.

What can you tell me about the Fantasy Three?

Fantasy Three was me, Charlie Rock and Larry D. We had an independent label, we was on Specific Records. We did a record called ‘It’s Your Rock’, and what got us over was OC’s remix on the b-side. So now people playin’ the b-side and all I had to do was go, ‘Silver Fox! Silver Fox! Silver Fox!’ So now I could go to clubs with two of those and I’m rapping off of my beat that I had. I’m taking that and I’m running with it. Now the Trash Crew are biting off us. When they came out with that song ‘On The Radio’, it was the same music. I sat with Pumpkin and him and I actually constructed this music, so I know every note, every key, every drum beat. And these guys, the Crash Crew, they had our original music! I couldn’t fathom for the life of me how they got it. So we formed our own label – CCL Records – which was what our next record was on. It was called ‘Biters In The City’.

Didn’t they step to you at a show?

Yeah. In 1984, at Broadway International Disco. We had arranged a battle with them, ‘cos I was really dissing ‘em on the radio. All through New York I was on the radio calling ‘em ‘The Trash Crew’, saying, ‘Y’all can’t deal with me!’ So then we set-up a battle. Now we’re doing our record, they did they record, now it was time for us to battle – so I battled them myself. My boys, they didn’t want to get on, for some reason or other – Larry D and Charlie. But after a while of me battling ‘em, then they came out and they did they thing also. So after I got off stage these guys stepped to me – the Crash Crew – ‘cos they wanted to fight. They wasn’t ready to battle, they just wanted to fight, so we had some physical altercations. Master OC from the Fearless Four, he was cutting for me, so he cut the music and we was just fighting! [laughs] We were just throwing down inside the place. It was crazy.

Who actually won the fight?

I didn’t get hurt – I got dirty, though. I wasn’t trying to fight them guys, I was trying to back-off from them – ‘cos I’m in a party! ‘Y’all wanna fight?’ I pulled off my belt – my buckle said FOX on it. I wanted to keep them a distance from me ‘cos there were five of ‘em, and they were all coming at me. So I start swinging – boom, boom, boom! The thing is, the people from where they live at was battling the people from where I’m from! So there was so many fights goin’ on in there, ‘cos my peoples like, ‘Yo man, nobody’s touching Fox!’ And then they people was like, ‘Yo, we gonna fight!’ ‘Cos I just put a bruise to they ego! [laughs] When I left outta there, I had some white pants on – my white pants were all dirty and grimy and stuff – and I went to the record shop. Around the corner from the record shop that we owned was a little social club called La Familia. My partners that was down with me, they Puerto Rican – that’s how I learned my Spanish – and I was in that club after the battle, sittin’ there drinking champagne and talking ‘bout, ‘Man, I ripped ‘em’. Everybody was chanting for us because we represented our hood where we from, and I was talking about them on the radio so much and I represented and I didn’t back down from them.

Can you tell me more about the ‘Biters In The City’ record?

The whole thing, everything except for the sixteen bars that my boys did, I wrote! That was battle rhyme that I was gonna use for Moe Dee! Charlie came with sixteen bars and Larry came with his sixteen. Larry was a hungry guy too, he was hungry for it. He kept working to get the rhymes going so he could become an MC, except me and Charlie had beef so much, because he wanted the music to go in another direction. He wanted us to become singers after a while. I’m like, ‘I’ll sing a bit – I don’t mind – but I’m not gonna be singing all the way! We rip! I’m a MC, man. I’m into rap! That’s my thing, that’s what I do and that’s what I perfected at!’ And the thing I didn’t like also was our name – Fantasy?! Here we are, we surrounded by the Fearless Four, the Treacherous Three, the Furious Five…and then along comes Fantasy Three! I’m like, ‘That’s soft, man! That makes anybody wanna battle us! I’m Silver Fox, man. My name rings bells, man!’ We came with another joint called ‘Summer’ with ‘The Buck Stops Here’ on the b-side. ‘The Buck…’ was supposed to be my springboard because was having a lotta internal struggles within our group, so I’m like, ‘Well if things don’t work out I can at least do The Buck as my solo’. Everything was bad – our label was bad, our management was bad. We almost had a contract with Polygram Records, but we couldn’t got out of the contract that we was in. Larry and Charlie were tellin’ me that I didn’t want to go there, so that’s the reason why we didn’t go! But I don’t remember it like that – ‘cos it was called CCL Records – which stood for ‘Chico, Charlie, Larry’. Chico was the guy that put up money, Charlie was Charlie Rock and Larry was Larry D – so there was no ‘Chico, Charlie, Larry, Fox’! None of that. So I didn’t have any piece of the label or nothing, all I would receive would be my 33 1/3% royalty. It was madness. So after a while I just said, ‘Let me get out of New York, man.’ So I bounced to Atlantic City.

So how did you connect with G Rap and LL since you weren’t from Queens?

I’m from Manhattan, and they came from Queens to meet me. Kool G Rap would come to the after hours spot that I would go to. He was always there. Me and him, we was always battlin’ each other! [laughs] Every week he would get prepared with new stuff and be like, ‘Come on Fox – I got you this time!’ It would be friendly rivalry, you know what I mean? So it would never be like where I’m trying to take him out – you know, ‘Talk about your moms and kill your cat, your dog’ type battle stuff. It was more-or-less, ‘Let’s see who runs outta rhymes first’. Me, I had a habit of just goin’ on and on with it. I have rhymes that’s accumulated, where I could just spend all day and just go through it. At that time I was also creating stuff – I wanted to be inventive. Like creating the ‘run-on’ sentence – keep going with things like ‘a’, ‘k’, like, ‘I have a story I must relay, it happened to me on a Monday/ was sittin’ alone in a café, a pretty lady – she came my way/ she said, ‘You wanna share a little Monet? I said, ‘I don’t mind, it’d be OK’/ she grabbed my hand, walked to a Chevrolet, we stepped inside – she drove away/ she said, ‘My name is Faye, got a sister named Kaye’….’ And it just keeps going on and on.

Did you help G Rap develop that into his ‘Preacher, feature, creature, teacher…’ style?

Yeah. Kool G loved that, and I was nasty in that. He took it to another level also – he took it to a street level. Even with ‘It’s A Demo’ – those were rhymes that I remember him doing up in Joe Grants. That’s my man, so with him listening to me all the time, he couldn’t help but to emulate some of the stuff that I do. And that was the same with LL, too. At the time that he started this was a whole new thing – to articulate and use words that people aren’t using now. Even when he came out with ‘I Need A Beat’ he’s talking about, ‘A scenario for your stereo/beat under rhyme and vital is the ratio’. Who understands that except for somebody who has a collegiate vocabulary? That was something that we talked about when he was writing ‘I Need A Beat’, ‘cos we were listening to T La Rock’s ‘It’s Yours’. I would also talk with Special K and DLB from the Fearless Four, ‘cos these were the guys that were actually talking lyricism to another level, to a level that nobody else was doing. L was good at that – he would fill it up with metaphors and he could faster, he could go slow. But he’s a chameleon [laughs]. A lotta stuff that he came out with…like he’s feeling Run-DMC at the time, or he’s feeling EPMD, so he does something similar. What I liked about him was that he was bright, smart, intelligent, clean-cut…but he was very arrogant and wanted to get his thing on. I even took him to OC’s house where Moe Dee kicked us out of there! [after LL had begun rhyming on Fox’s instruction].

Is it true that LL called your record shop after getting the number off the label of the Fantasy 3 record?

Yeah. This was 1983. He came down to the record shop – he wanted to be signed, basically! He was lookin’ for a label. We talked about rap and everything, we was actually just hangin’ out. When L met me, I’m in my twenties and he’s sixteen years old. When I heard him I was like, ‘Aw man! It’s your time, man! This is your time. Don’t you know?’ He knew it. He felt it, but it’s just that nobody was ready. It took somebody like Rick Rubin that had the same vision that he had, and be able to take it and mould it to bring out an LL. Nobody else could see it, ‘cos they were stuck in that other stuff that started out in the 70’s and didn’t want to go to the next level. The music was in its infancy. It was time for a change, it was about to go through a metamorphosis. All the old school rappers were getting older, and there was a new generation that were buying records – and you don’t want to buy a record that your dad’s making, right? And L opened up the door for a lotta these young cats to start coming out. Before there was a Will Smith, there was LL! What I love about L, man – his first album, there wasn’t a curse word on it! Wait, maybe one song [laughs] He did ‘Jack The Ripper’ – that was the baddest! Wasn’t no cursing, no talking about slinging your drugs. He didn’t talk about what kind of gold he had on – he just wore it! He didn’t talk about his watch – he just let you see it!

How old was G Rap when you first met him?

G Rap was on some old gangster stuff when he was a kid. That stuff he talk about, ‘his life ain’t no fairytale’? It’s not! He was from a dysfunctional situation. He was a kid hangin’ in after-hours spots at three in the morning. When I met him, he was like 13 or something like that. But he was a 13 year-old hustler – with money – hanging with grown men. He had girls on corners, he had spots…everywhere he would go, he would go to pick-up money. He was everyday hustling, and it was two or three in the morning when he would stroll up into Joe Grants and we would be in there doing our rhymes. Him and L, man, I love them guys. Each one of them was different, man.

Kool G Rap – I call him the ‘anti-LL’. LL’s on this side, going, ‘Nah man, keep the cigarette smoke away from me. I’m no thug, I don’t wanna do that!’ And on the other side you’ve got Kool G Rap, and Kool G’s like, ‘Yo, man. You got Newports?’ And he’s talking, ‘I don’t give a fuck, nigga! Fuck that shit! Fuck these niggas!’ And LL’s going, ‘Oh, to heck with that!’ They like two different sides of me or something. They done flip coins on the Fox! These my dogs, man. Kool G Rap put my name on his first album – I appreciated that. LL – it took him like four albums before he said, ‘Oh yeah…Silver Fox’. [laughs] When L first came at me, when he started rapping I’m hearing [makes wheezing noise] He was struggling to keep going and take a breather. I had to show him the spot to breathe at. ‘Nah man, in order to be long-winded, you gotta know when to breathe. You gotta know when to keep yourself going – where to breathe at’. That’s the same thing with Kool G Rap, ‘cos Kool G had a mouthful of gold in his mouth, so he always talked like he had marbles in his mouth! [laughs]

Me and L had a one-on-one thing inside of the record shop, and that brought about a real closeness. Me and L would be sitting there with our notebooks in our hand and somebody walks into the record shop – ‘Hey man, what’s up? What you need? Do what you gotta do and bounce, so I can take care of this.’ My mother cooked and he ate some of my mom’s food, we went to White Plains where I had my little baby over there. We hung-out like that. Now me and G Rap – it was mostly in that after-hours spot. That builds a bond which was totally different. It builds a bond where it’s mad respect – he’d respect my game of rap, because anytime he came in he’s hearing something different, something new. He’s sitting back going, ‘Damn! I gotta do some more!’ ‘Cos this is what he wanted to do! Every week we was into it, so he was learning from me on a weekly basis. Sometimes I would go in there on a Thursday too, so it would be Thursday, Friday, Saturday. Here he go, goin’ to school! Then when my record came out, he was doing a show in Brooklyn and he put me on the flyer. I had a record out and it was hittin’ all through New York, and he’s like, ‘I’mma put him on the flyer, I’mma get mad heads up in there and I’mma make some money!’ I was like, ‘I’ll do it, but you’re gonna have to do some rhymes with me or something’. And he got on there and was doing his thing. It was a beautiful experience, it was all good.

How did you develop your style?

I learned from other MC’s, just listening to what they did, how they’re music was structured. I didn’t just listen to their rhymes, ‘cos me myself, I couldn’t listen to people’s rhymes all the time, ‘cos then I’ll start emulating them and I’ll start sounding like ‘em – and I couldn’t do that. And that’s what happened with these guys [LL and G Rap]. They listened to me all the time, they would be with me and then they start emulating me. They couldn’t help it! And this stuff is timeless – it lasted for over 25 years. I’m the only cat that call him CJ, trust me. I told him, ‘LL Cool J’s too long, man. I ain’t sayin’ all of that stuff.’ I take the ‘Ladies Love’ stuff outta there and call him Cool J. ‘Yo! CJ!’ I could do that, ‘cos I’m Fox.

Who was your main influence?

Mel is the one who influenced me to really do it. He just kept goin’ with his rhymes and he was so articulate and he used current events and put it into his raps. How could you top ‘Beat Street Breakdown?’ I went to go see Melle Mel and the Furious Five at a party when the Cassanovas robbed everybody. He said, ‘Throw ya hands in the air…now keep ‘em there!’ And everybody was gettin’ stuck up! I’m looking around, going, ‘Oh, snap! They robbin’ people right in front of me, man!’ People gettin’ punched in the face, people gettin’ stuck-up, people gettin’ their jewelery taken! And I went there by myself because I wanted to see Melle Mel – I wasn’t thinkin’ about the rest of the guys – I wanted to see him. I’m from Manhattan and I’d gone all the way to The Bronx. I always felt in awe of Mel, and that was the only cat in rap that I was actually in awe of. Other than that, everybody else…I mean I liked their raps and I appreciate it, but I only listen to them for a minute and that’s it. When I started creating stuff, I was my own influence.

Did you know Ultramagnetic?

Yeah man. Keith was the guy that I would chill with, ‘cos he was crazy! I like him. I mean he was literally crazy, like he should be put in an asulym. I loved hangin’ with him and just sitting and talking with him. When you think about their lyrics? It only makes sense to people like them. It makes sense if you high and outta your mind! They did a show where all of ‘em were high on angel dust! I looked at them and said, ‘These boys are zootie, yo!’ [laughs]

What was the most memorable battle you ever had?

The best battle I had was with Kool G Rap and LL [laughs]. Me and L use to go for days, man. We would travel places and we’d battle each other, sitting on the train – ‘cos he would always want to battle me. We were on a plane, goin’ from Manhattan to upstate New York, and we would be battling each other all the way there! The trip was 45 minutes long, so for 45 minutes we would be battling each other!

Silver Fox @ MySpace

Fantasy Three - ‘It’s Your Rock’

Fantasy Three - ‘Biter’s In The City’

Fantasy Three - ‘The Buck Stops Here’

Also:

LL Cool J – The Unkut Interview

Dr. Butcher – The Unkut Interview Part 2

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35 Comments so far
Leave a comment

…way back.back into time.
very interesting.just know him
being mentioned by ll and kgr.
unkut to da fullest.props.

Comment by swordfish 01.21.09 @

and know i know what made g rap
trademark lisp.great interview.

Comment by swordfish 01.21.09 @

Who used the keyboard line in “It’s Your Rock” first, Fantasy Three or Crash Crew (“On the Radio)?

Comment by haroon 01.21.09 @

hey now hey now hey now… Biters In The City is the living Sh*t. Peace to Silver Fox and crew for this masterpiece. Practiced footwork and powermoves for years listening to this cut. This was a lot of heads favourite back in the day if not now. Fox’s attitude spoke for every one tryna’ show people what’s up! ha. Nice one Robbie (again n again n again…)

Comment by AO 01.21.09 @

This is a great piece, Robbie. Keep ‘em comin’ in 2009.

Comment by fosterakahunter 01.21.09 @

I only knew about him through the mentions in your previous interviews. Very interesting. Thanks!

Comment by Krisch 01.21.09 @

superb interview as always robbie.

Comment by KQ 01.21.09 @

Wow, you just blew up the spot with this one Robbie……Thank you very much…

Comment by shamz 01.21.09 @

I never really knew about this cat before. Great stuff Robbie Allah.

Comment by End Level Boss 01.21.09 @

haroon, Fox explains it in the interview. Crash Crew used his beat.

Comment by Robbie 01.22.09 @

It’s good to finally hear his side of the story.

Great interview Robbie.

Dr. Butcher…

Comment by Dr. Butcher 01.22.09 @

wow man… a piece of history right there… another nice interview

Comment by er4se 01.23.09 @

Sorry, I wrote that in a rush before I had time to read the interview :)

Comment by haroon 01.24.09 @

YO! World Class interviews. This site should be required reading for all HIP HOP listeners and REAL fans. the info on this site is the embodiment of CULTURE. It’s priceless. Salaam, Robbie

Comment by Wa'il 01.24.09 @

unkut = masta historian. Thanks for making the hiphop archive.

P E A C E

bw

Comment by BlindWilliam 02.01.09 @

Good interview…

I know this is off topic but Drew aka Dr. Butcher if you reading this could you hook up Akinyele’s – No Exit (Part2) please? It’s on the “Break A Bitch Neck” Testpress and from what i heard there was like 10 to 20 copies.

uno

Comment by Stiefel 02.08.09 @

“I went to go see Melle Mel and the Furious Five at a party when the Cassanovas robbed everybody. He said, ‘Throw ya hands in the air…now keep ‘em there!’ And everybody was gettin’ stuck up!”

Sounds just like those lines LL had at the end of “Cheesy Rat Blues”…

Comment by P-Matik 03.26.09 @

Peace cool interview didnt know My own borough manhattan had such a strong mc presence all i heard was mostly queens and the bronx and brookly when ppl talk about hip hop history. I reside around rock steady park and we know about the break crew history more either way i am stll nice on the dance floor. Peace

Comment by E-mecca 03.28.09 @

THANX FOR ALL THAT READ IT! YEAH IT WAS BACK IN THE DAZE OF YES YES YALL! I SEEM TO BE THE MOST UNKNOWN KNOW RAPPER! PEACE FROM SUILVER FOX

Comment by SILVER FOX 05.01.09 @

PS CHECK ME OUT AT http://WWW.MYSPACE.COM/SILVERFOX125 AND FACEBOOK. CHECK MY PROFILE ON HIP-HOP.NET AND FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER!

Comment by SILVER FOX 05.01.09 @

I’ve read about Silver Fox, but until now never heard any of his music – that’s what I love about unkut! I can see why so many legendary rappers look up to him. Until now, I thought Kool Moe Dee was the only rapper at that time with a tight flow. Listening to him on Biters In The City, my dude sounds ahead of his time which is good.

Comment by Martin- digitalsoulexperience.com.com 07.20.09 @

Silver Fox is all over the internet. I was researching an article and his name popped up.
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multisyllabic_rhymes) He did say he influenced Kool G Rap. More importantly he influenced the newer direction rapping would take after 1985. That’s historical. Great piece Robbie!

Comment by Martin - digitalsoulexperience.com 07.31.09 @

MAN LISTEN REAL TALK I DID HAVE A LOT TO DO WITH CHANGING THE SPIT GAME A BIT. I STUDIED POETRY SINCE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. NOW UNDERSTAND WHEN I STARTED I WAS OLDER THAN MOST MCS (BESIDES KOOL HURK, EDDIE CHEEBA,DJ HOLLYWOOD, AND A FEW OTHERS. I KNEW WHER RAP WAS GOING AND IT NEEDED TO BE TAKEN OUT OF THE ELEMENTARY STAGE TO ANOTHER LEVEL. I WORKED WITH LL COOL JAY (AT MANHATTANVILLE RECORD SHOP)FOR MONTHS CAUSE THE MAN WAS GOOD! WE WOULD BATTLE FOR DAYS AND NOT SAY THE SAME RYMES. KOOL G RAP WAS A BEAST THAT WOULD BATTLE ME EVERY CHANCE HE GOT (EVERY WEEKEND AT JOE GRANTS)AND WOULD START OVER AND OVER TILL HE GOT IT RIGHT. THERE ARE A HOST OF OTHERS THAT WOULD LISTEN TO MY HIP HOP PHILOSOPHY (LMFAO)BUT I WONT MENTION THEM I LET THEM MENTION ME…I’M JUST PROUD THAT TWO OF THE GREATEST INOVATORS IN HIP HOP WERE FROM THE SILVER FOX SCHOOL OF RAP YA HEARD! PEACE

Comment by SILVER FOX 09.30.09 @

PS…..GOOGLE ME..SILVERFOXMUSICUS . AND FIND THE FREE DOWNLOADS AT SOUNDCLOUD.COM..OR CHECK ME OUT AT http://www.myspace.com/silverfox111 and http://www.myspace.com/silverfox125 PEACE AND THANX FOR ALL THE POSTIVE INPUT!

Comment by SILVER FOX 09.30.09 @

i have to big up Silver Fox for being the type of Mc that would go looking for cats. I love hearing that. Thats the point. If you a battle “mc” why wait for someone to come find you. Fuck that! You go and find them. Chop of the head and keep it moving. I love moe dee but my guess is he knew what time it was. an believe me imma moe dee fan. i loved the way he ripped ll on deathblow especially with the letter L sequence.I only wish Silverfox had had the time to do a solo LP. Its like i say THE REAL BEST MC,S WILL NEVER REALLY BE HEARD. Its just the way it goes. Everybody knows that cat that can rhyme crazy but doesnt think anything of it. He just spits it into the atmosphere. Only a chosan few and the Universe itself ever get to hear them. Daaaaaaaag…..Chill

Comment by christopher 11.29.09 @

true story..I met the fox when he lived in atlantic ity…we worked together in a retail store, I learned that he can rapp..he was real talented i’m like yo im a dee-jay hes like word..im like yea he took me under his wing introduced me to one of his producers home of da interprise studios..made me wanna jump in the game and make some trax…the rest is history..SPIT ON EM!!! 1 love to the fox..ajay-what!!! out..

Comment by ajay-what!!! 01.01.10 @

MY MAN AJ WHAT! I DID SOME UNDERGROUND WORK WITH HIM! HE WAS AND STILL IS A TALENTED GUY! WITH A HOME STUDIO ON THE OUTSKIRTS OPF ATLANTIC CITY! 1 LUV MY DUDE FOR KEEPIN IT REAL.

Comment by SILVER FOX 01.03.10 @

YO I AM 44 YEARS OLD (2010) AND FROM THE BRONX. YO, SILVERFOX WAS THE NIGGA BACK IN 83,84. ALL MY BOYS PLAYED “I’TS YOUR ROCK” EVEN IN 2010 THAT BEAT IS STILL HOT. I REMEMBER GOING TO A PARTY IN 1984 AT THE SKATING RINK IN BERGENFIELD, NJ AND THE RAP SUPERSTARS OF THE TIME (KOOL MOE D, FEARLESS 4, DOUGIE FRESH, RUN DMC) WERE THERE AND I SWEAR TO YOU THE HOTTEST SONG PLAYED THAT NIGHT WAS THE INSTRUMENTAL SIDE TO IT’S YOUR ROCK. IT WAS THROWN ON AND EVERY MC ON THAT STAGE ONLY RAPPED TO THAT RECORD-THAT’S HOW HOT IT WAS AT THAT TIME-I STILL GOT THE TAPE AND LISTEN TO IT ONCE A YEAR EVEN NOW IN 2010. SILVERFOX WAS SUPER NICE AND HE TALKED BIG SHIT-THAT’S WHY WE ALL LOVED THAT NIGGA. SILVERFOX WAS THAT NIGGA!!!!!

Comment by SmoothLord 12.14.10 @

THANKS FOR ALL THE BIG UPS BRAH! IMA BEAST!!! LOL

Comment by SILVERFOX 02.08.11 @

robbie my hero man!!!!!! keep goin

Comment by Ell 02.25.11 @

WHATS GOOD FAM CHECK OUT NEW SILVER FOX MUSIC @ http://WWW.REVERBNATION.COM/MCSILVERFOX PS THE LOST TRACKS @ http://WWW.SOUNDCLOUD.COM/SILVERFOXMUSICUS 100S FAM!

Comment by SILVER FOX 04.21.11 @

Great Interview! Silver Fox is truely history in the making. And to date his lyrical content is still ahead of the time. I grew up listening to him and he later helped to mold and mentor me to develope my own style and be creative. Took me into a lot of dangerous spots too…but then again he can be a dangerous guy…lol…especially back then. But it’s all good. Lots of fun! Lov Yah Big Bro! Now lets get ready for a new project! Stay tune! :)

Comment by EL Guapo Callejero 04.22.11 @

Silver Fox is still mentoring the next line of hip hop icons, this guy stands out as one of the most influential people in hip hop, even if you never heard of him. Hes got love and respect from east to west, north and south, europe and across the globe. This guy should be on time magazine, thats not light talk, thats the real. MC Silver Fox the Legend…

Comment by Jayton tha Mac 07.05.12 @

Yo, this is CEE-ROCK “THE FURY” (Founder/CEO of !Handzup! Network). I just had an incredible reading and I’d like to thank UNKUT for that. Great interview with my homie SILVER FOX! It don’t get any better than that type of history right there. I felt like I was lost in a ‘Wild Style’ script or something.

I just did a new music video called “Linden Boulez” and I’m proud to have LEGENDARY MC SILVER FOX to cameo in it (along with KOOL KYLE THE STARCHILD and TSKI VALLEY).

You can view the video at this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDdhTD1sBGY

Good lookin’ out, FOX!!!

Comment by FURY ANDERSON pka CEE-ROCK "THE FURY" 09.03.13 @

PEACE AND BLESS FAM!! FIND MORE SILVER FOX MUSIC @WWW.SOUNDCLOUD.COM/SILVERFOXMUSICUS FOLLOW ON TWITTER @SILVERFOX125 THANKS FOR THE LOVE FAM!!

Comment by SILVER FOX 05.14.14 @



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