Video: Greyson & Jasun – Livin’ Like A Troopa [1991]

After having this Vance Wright produced gem on repeat for the last few days after being reunited with my records, I stumbled across the video today. Two things worth noting – Greyson and Jaysun might have sold more records if they’d shot a cover photo dressed like this instead of the whole “suits in an abandoned bath house” look they went with, and this is still the finest use of “The Big Payback” loop ever used in rap, thanks to the slight pitch distortion effect, which I’m sure was the result of something messing up in the studio for brilliant results along the lines of the “Top Billin’” drum pattern.



Doug E. Fresh and Slick Rick – La Di Da Di [Live At The Polo Grounds]

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Now that my entire vinyl collection has been reunited at the CRC HQ, I can get back to the time-honored tradition of ripping vinyl again. To set it off, here’s a live recording of the “La Di Da Di” from the Polo Grounds at some time in the 80′s. It cuts off before the big payoff but it’s worth a spin just to hear the reaction of the crowd, who proceed to loose their shit at various points.



Download: Kamakaze – Head On Promo Tape [1995]

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Thanks to The T.R.O.Y. Blog you can finally hear the unreleased Kamakaze album that the late KL and Kyron recorded with Marley Marl for Warner Bros. around ’94/’95. Special mention goes out to Poet for saying “Fuck the Juice Crew, we got some new niggas!” on “House ‘O Hitz Crew.”
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Is Aaron Fuchs Really The Ultimate Bloodsucker of Hip-Hop?
Thursday February 20th 2014,
Filed under: Features,Non-Rapper Dudes,Not Your Average,The 80's Files
Written by:

impeach-the-president-ltd-edition-gold-vinyl-the-honeydrippers-funky-delicacies-9607

The wolves are out. Irate rap fans everyone are calling for Aaron Fuchs‘ head on a pike following with the recent news that his publishing company Tuf America was suing singer Frank Ocean for unauthorized use of Mary J. Blige‘s “Real Love,” which he sung a portion of in the track “Super Rich Kids.” Predictably, this resulted in responses such as ?uestlove‘s tweet: “when i speak and reference the bloodsuckers of hip hop only ONE person comes to mind” despite the fact that Frank Ocean is technically an R&B singer. Aaron Fuchs seems to have provided a convenient scapegoat as the stereotypical “evil Jewish record label owner” who’s only purpose in life is to exploit black musicians in order to fill his own coffers. Based on the testimonies of some former Tuff City artists and a peanut gallery of online writers, this may seem to be the case. But things are never that cut and dried, so I thought it was time to investigate a little deeper than the first page of results from a Google search.
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DJ Stitches – The Unkut Interview

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The story of Charlie Rock aka DJ Stitches is a classic example of how brutal the music industry can be. As a founding member of De La Soul, only himself discarded once they signed their first record deal, he went on to score a contract with Mercury Records for his next group – Class A Felony – only to have the album stuck in limbo for two years after his MC was brutally murdered in a bungled robbery attempt. Having also been involved with records for Uptown and Ilacoin, Stitches shared a number of behind-the-scenes incidents during his extended tour of duty in the rap world, and revealed some untold Long Island hip-hop history.

Robbie: What inspired you become a DJ originally?

DJ Stitches: I’m from South Jamaica, Queens – Southside. The hip-hop scene in Queens – 1978, 1979 – I seen some DJ’s, and my cousin from The Bronx, Mixmaster TC and the Soul City Crew, he used to let me mess around on his turntables. I mighta been like eleven or twelve. Me and my cousin Blinky kinda had the bug since then, and I migrated to Long Island in ninth grade and then came to North Amityville.
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Diamond D – The Unkut Interview

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Growing up in Forest Projects in the South Bronx, DJ Diamond D embarked on a career as a local DJ before teaming-up with childhood friend Master Rob to form the Ultimate Force crew and release the “I’m Not Playing” single on Strong City. Following on from yesterdays detailed breakdown of his first solo album, we discussed his formative years as a music fan, his loyalty to those he grew-up with and some of his lesser known musical contributions beyond his work with the D.I.T.C. crew.

Robbie: How old were you when you first deejayed publicly?

Diamond D: First time I deejayed in public I was around 13, 14 in my projects at the jams outside. There were two DJ’s in my neighborhood – DJ Supreme and DJ Hutch. They would come outside and basically provide the soundtrack to our lives, through hip-hop. At some point, from me pestering them, they let me get on their set. To me that was the biggest deal, to be able to get on the turntables in your projects and feel the love of the people that were in the projects, basically.
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Track By Track: Diamond D Breaks Down The Stunts, Blunts & Hip-Hop Album

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Today marks ten years since I started Unkut Dot Com, and what better way to celebrate than to sit down with the original “Best Producer On The Mic” himself, Diamond D. Originally scheduled to take place in late 2012 to mark the 20th anniversary of his classic debut album, Stunts, Blunts & Hip-Hop, it wasn’t until last week that it finally happened. We began by discussing his timeless debut, track-by-track:

Diamond D: I’mma keep it a hunned with you, I only wanted twelve songs on there. But you’ve gotta remember in the early 90′s it wasn’t uncommon for an album to have 18, 19 songs. You look at Pete Rock‘s album, Mecca and the Soul Brother. You look at De La Soul‘s first album. If it had been up to me it wouldn’t have been 21 songs on that album. But Chemistry was just like, “We gonna just roll the dice and throw all the shit on there.” I can’t say which ones I would have left off, but I can tell you I ain’t want all 21 on there! But it seems like it’s good that they did that, because I never put out an album with them again.
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Twenty Rap Albums To Be Buried With

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I’ve had a few requests of late to break-down my list of personal favorite rap albums, so to set off this tenth anniversary week of Unkut Dot Com, here are the twenty tapes I’d like to be buried with, or take to a desert island with a crate of AA batteries for the Walkman.
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Live Review: Run The Jewels, Danny Brown and Earl Sweatshirt @ The Palace, Melbourne

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Clearly not a picture of last night’s show.

In the interest of “music journalism” I forced myself to attend a rap show last night featuring rappers I don’t really listen to on a regular basis, but don’t really have any huge level of hate for either, which is about as good as it’s going to get until Nice & Smooth decide to tour these shores. After enjoying a few rounds of boilermakers and weed with some associates, we wandered into the venue the very moment that El-P and Killer Mike hit the stage.
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Six Under-Appreciated Guest Raps
Thursday February 06th 2014,
Filed under: Features,Not Your Average
Written by:

bigbird-snl1

Posse cuts are a well-worn topic of discussion on the proverbial rap stoop, but spare a thought for those guest shots on other people’s albums, many of which seem to slip through the liner notes. Here are six cameos that spring to mind…

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Pre-Order: 93 til Infinity Souls Super Bundle

The latest collectible from Get On Down is this Souls of Mischief ’93 Til Infinity bundle includes a Hiero Light Box, a music box, gatefold 2XLP, a t-shirt and eleven bonus tracks. Unfortunately there’s no sign of the instrumentals, which I copped on double vinyl from the Hiero site years ago and allowed me to enjoy the production goodness of this album minus the high-pitched rapping.



Timeless Classics Or Only Classics For Their Time?
Monday February 03rd 2014,
Filed under: Albums,Crates,Face Off,Features,Listicles,The 80's Files,The Unkut Opinion
Written by:

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Every now and then, one of these rap websites puts together a list along the lines of “The 30 Greatest Hip-Hop Albums of 1993″ and such, which in theory isn’t something I should have an issue with. The reason I mention it is that a decent proportion of these albums – most of which are widely regarded as “classic” and important records – don’t exactly inspire me to dig them out of the shelves and throw them onto the turntable (or, if I’m feeling lazy, navigate to the folder on my hard drive). Is this simply due to the fact that I played that shit to death back when it was released? Or is it more of a case that some music outlives its usefulness?

Take De La Soul’s much discussed 3 Feet High And Rising, for example. While there’s no doubting the impact and originality that Prince Paul and Plugs 1, 2 and 3 brought to the table, I can confidently state that I have no intention to ever listen to that record in it’s entirety in the foreseeable future. That’s likely more of a reflection of my preference for anti-social rap with loud drums than anything else, but it’s an issue worth considering. Let’s take a look at the 1989′s greatest hip-hop albums according to ego trip‘s Book of Rap Lists for example:
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Non-Rapper Dudes Series – Spencer Bellamy Interview
Monday February 03rd 2014,
Filed under: BK All Day,Features,Interviews,Non-Rapper Dudes,Video Clips
Written by:

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After coming up with Howie Tee as DJ and then producer, Spencer Bellamy started East Flatbush Project and released a series of quality records on his own 10/30 Uproar label at the beginning of the mid 90′s independent hip-hop vinyl movement. Best known for being the man responsible for the legendary “Tried By 12″ instrumental, Spencer talks about the ups and downs of his experiences in the rap game.

Robbie: Can you tell me about how you started off with Howie Tee?

Spencer Bellamy: He used to have a crew called Count Disco. We were a local crew – myself, his brother and Howie would DJ – and then he had the MC’s, the Sureshot 4 MC’s, so they would do their routines. I hooked-up with him when I was around eleven years old. We played together for a few years and then we just became cool. After he cut-out of deejaying and went more into the production side of it, I would just watch what he would do. I was kinda like an apprentice, so to speak. From there, I tried my hand at production.
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DJ Cash Money – Echo Scratch

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One of Philly’s favorite sons unleashing four minutes of fury on Lady B‘s The Street Beat radio show. Stuff like this reminds me of why I became hopelessly addicted to this here rap music.

Bonus echo:
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Sir Ibu – The Unkut Interview

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Born and raised in Bedford-Stuyvesant/Crown Heights, Sir Ibu cemented a place in rap folklore with a record called “Holy War (Live)”, which still stands as one of the rawest examples of beats and rhymes ever recorded, so much so that Ghostface recreated a portion of it on his own modern-day remake named “Mighty Healthy”. Beyond being an influential microphone god, it turns out that Ibu may also have been the first ever Conservative Rap Coalition member, as well as having an obscure connection to Australian culture. Salutes to BK Thoroughbred for connecting me with Brooklyn rap royalty and helping this interview happen…

Robbie: What sparked your interest in rhyming initially?

Sir Ibu: It was my cousin – I think it was back in ‘79. I heard him rapping, and I was like, “Wow! What is that?” So he told me what it was and then let me hear this record. I think it was by Spoonie Gee? I kinda liked that, so ever since then I just started writing. I just used to write about girls – all my raps were about girls. Girls this, girls that, just bragging about how I am with the girls. So then when I ran into Supreme – I would say was about ‘83, ‘84 – he told me, “Listen, you’re good. But you could be better if you changed your subject matter. Instead of talking about how good you are with girls, talk about how good you are on the microphone. How good you are with your lyrics and your music and your rhymes and your vocabulary. Just anything but girls!” I’m like, “Alright.” So I did it and I came back to him and I said, “How ‘bout this?” And he said, “That’s perfect! Do you wanna be part of my group?” I’m like, “Alright, let’s do it.” And that’s how I got with him and his sister. It’s interesting, ‘cos his sister – her name was Ice-T originally when we started – but Ice-T from the west coast started making a name for himself, so it was like, “Listen, you’ve gotta change your name.” So she changed it to Nefertiti.
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