Introducing The 90’s Rapper Where Are They Now Detective Agency
Wednesday July 29th 2015,
Filed under: Crates,Features,Not Your Average,The 90's Files,Where Are They Now?
Written by:

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Do you ever sit around and wonder ‘What the hell happened to that marginally talented rap crew who released an album in the early nineties?’ If so, I’m here to help. It turns out that some of your old favorites didn’t all go back to working ‘civilian’ jobs after the roller coaster ride that is a recording contract. Some of them kept keeping on for another shot at fame, and a few are still releasing music this decade, believe it or not. I’ve previously posted modern efforts from The Legion and Freestyle Professors, but after donning my grey trenchcoat and developing a Columbo style wonky eye I was able to dig up the following:
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Dream Team Rap Combos
Tuesday July 28th 2015,
Filed under: Features,Not Your Average,The Unkut Opinion
Written by:

DreamTeam

There’s going to be a Sean Price album produced entirely by Lil’ Fame, which is a true reason for the CRC to celebrate since it means that we don’t have to hear Termanology waste any more Fizzy Womack beats for a little while, but also because they both continue to put in some fine work. That being said, some of these rap team-ups are inevitably better on paper than the finished result. I’m sure DJ Premier and Nas will get around to recording an album in 2050 to a captive audience of fifteen people, but in the meantime I’m still campaigning for an group featuring Grand Daddy I.U., Roc Maciano and Parrish Smith called Strong Island Styling, with Prince Paul on the beats. Since the build your own supergroup topic has already been done here, let’s stick to producer and MC combos.

Here are album five team-ups that I would pay money for:
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Download: A Salute To Hurby Luv Bug

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Hurby ‘Lug Bug’ Azor played a big part in exposing a different style of Queens rap to the world as his Idol Makers crew concentrated on dressing fly, club hopping and bagging the opposite sex, largely favoring story-telling over the classic brag and boast technique. Hurby’s appreciation of go-go beats, DMX shakers and classic breakbeats produced some dance floor classics before he broke through to the pop charts with Salt-N-Pepa’s ‘Push It’ and into the movies via Kid ‘N Play‘s Houseparty franchise. After producing a couple of records for MC Shan‘s white reggae artist Snow in 1995, Hurby vanished from the music scene altogether. Here are what I consider to be his sixteen finest moments behind the boards.

Download: A Salute To Hurby Luv Bug

Track listing:
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Download: A Salute To One Shot Wonders

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Some of my favorite moments in rap have been provided by crews who only ever managed to release one single (or spot on a compilation) before vanishing from the limelight. This collection of sixteen one shot winners are tracks that have stood the test of time, despite their creators never rising to the ranks of the greats.

Download: A Salute To One Shot Wonders

Track listing:
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Does Record Label Interference Ever Make For Better Rap Albums?
Tuesday June 23rd 2015,
Filed under: Features,Not Your Average
Written by:

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The process of recording a rap album for a record label has often been fraught with artistic compromise, clueless A&R’s and misguided promotional campaigns. While what goes on behind the scenes has often remained a mystery, the arrival of the ‘Advance Promotional Cassettes’ in the early nineties offered a glimpse into ‘what might have been’ for a number of albums. I can recall reading reviews of several albums, only for some of the tracks mentioned to have mysteriously vanished by the time the album was released. A prime example of this was Show & AG‘s Goodfellas album, which had six of the tracks from the advance copy either replaced or remixed before it hit the shelves, while the sampler tape for Mobb Deep‘s Hell On Earth was largley comprised of songs destined for other peoples releases (‘Recognize and Realize,’ ‘Live Nigga Rap’) or soundtracks.

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Breakbeat Lou – The Unkut Interview
Friday June 19th 2015,
Filed under: Features,Interviews,Non-Rapper Dudes,Not Your Average,The 80's Files
Written by:

breakbeat-lou

Here’s the full version of my Breakbeat Lou interview, some of which was used in my Ultimate Breaks and Beats: An Oral History feature.

Robbie: How did you meet Lenny Roberts?

Breakbeat Lou: Lenny I’d met at Saul’s Record Pool, back in the early 80’s. There was a feedback committee meeting that we had and everyone was talking about regular rap records and regular music. That wasn’t what he was really into, he was more or a less a ‘in the house’ kinda DJ. There was a comment about a particular record and I said, ‘Yeah, I know that record.’ He said, ‘How do you know that record? You don’t seem like you’re into that particular thing.’ I was already DJing regular stuff. I’ve been in the game a long time – a DJ since ’74, hardcore digger since ’78, producer since ’80. That’s where the connection with breakbeats came in between him and I. He was already involved in going to the jams, ‘cos Lenny used to hang out at Bronx River. First it was bootleg 12’s that were being released – we released ‘Big Beat’, before that was ‘Funky President’ and ‘Long Red’ on Sure Shot Records. We also released the guava ‘Apache’ copies, ‘Chinese Chicken,’ ‘Impeach The President,’ the [Magic Disco Machine’s] ‘Scratchin” one sided 12′, the ‘Rocket In The Pocket.’
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A Tribute To Pumpkinhead

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Pumpkinhead and Sucio Smash [Photo by: Photo Rob]

As most of you already know, long-time indy rap champion Pumpkinhead passed away this week at only 39 years old, tragically leaving behind his pregnant wife and two kids. I’m not really qualified to speak on the man’s numerous contributions, but Chaz Kangas has put together a fitting tribute to the man for Complex, while some of his friends shared their fondest memories on Facebook:

DJ Eclipse: Some of us spend countless hours, days, months, years and even decades promoting others more so then we do ourselves. PH was one of those guys. Even though he made a name for himself in the battle scene and even made some records, it was his work here in NYC that I’ll remember even more. An integral part of the 90’s indie movement as well as today’s battle scene and a promoter of authentic acts and events, PH cared about the culture of Hip Hop. For him it was about your skills and how to improve on them. He was one of the ones that helped keep the foundation strong for others to go on and build careers.
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Download: Mobb Deep – Soundtrack and Compilation Cuts

mobbdeep

Twelve non-LP Mobb Deep tracks that were officially released on someone else’s album, as opposed to the seemingly endless supply of stuff that never got a proper retail release.

UPDATE: By popular demand, now available as a Zippyshare Records and Tapes download…

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Video: Czarface Will Make You Rich and Cure Herpes
Tuesday June 02nd 2015,
Filed under: Beantown,Not Your Average,Sizzle-chest,Wu-Tang Is For The Children
Written by:

Rofflecopters. I wonder if that 1800 number works?



Download: A Salute To Jigmastas

jigmastas

DJ Spinna and Kriminal provided the 1996 indy stand-out single, ‘Beyond Real’/’Dead Man Walking,’ which proved to be the one of the highlights of an extensive discography over the next six years. Spinna was in high demand during this period for his signature lush production style which combined restrained sampling and original riffs for an atmospheric canvas of sounds, while Krim provided the most compelling verbal contributions from a wide range of vocalists who utilized the Beyond Real catalog. Ignoring the hackneyed ‘conscious’/’underground’ cliches that came to sully much of the ‘independent as fuck’ mantra of the day, Kriminal maintained a refreshingly honest style of Brooklyn brag rap that wasn’t afraid to boast of of ‘putting a dick in your girl’ during a time of tiresome politically correct posturing and underground flag-waving.
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No Country For Old (Rap) Men: De La Soul and Jay Z are two sides of the same coin
Thursday May 14th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

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Is crowd funding your album any better than being a corporate shill?

No Country For Old (Rap) Men: De La Soul and Jay Z are two sides of the same coin



Psycho Les [The Beatnuts] – The Unkut Interview

Psycho Les

Following on from last year’s interview with former Beatnut Al’ Tariq, I finally got a chance to speak with Psycho Les about the ups and downs of one of rap’s greatest groups. Turns out that Les’ history foes back even further than I thought, as he revealed he worked at Music Factory during high school and produced his first record in 1988…

Robbie: Do you feel like Al’ Tariq’s comments about his time with the Beatnuts were accurate?

Psycho Les: It was pretty much right. Me and Al’ Tariq never had a problem. The problem was between Juju and him, they didn’t really get along. When people don’t get along shit ain’t gonna happen.

He mentioned some subliminal stuff between him and Tribe Called Quest and De La Soul?

There was subliminal shit going on but it was more on Juju and Fashion’s part. That had nothing to do with me, I always stay away from any negative shit. I ain’t out to diss nobody.

What made you want to get involved in hip-hop?

Just being a kid from the streets. When I was coming up in mid ’80s the streets was the only place you could find hip-hop. You would go to the parks and we would have the cardboards, people breakdancing and the guy with his boom box playing tapes of Cold Crush and Spoonie Gee and Kool Moe Dee and all that shit. I was into everything of the culture, man – from breaking to graffiti, I did it all. I just fell in love with the music, just watching the DJ and all the power he had. I started messing with all the DJ’s that lived in my building. I would go to their apartments and watch them DJ. From there I developed the whole dream to have turntables and mixers and collecting records.
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Gettin’ Kinda Hectic: Snap! and Chill Rob G’s Epic ‘Power’ Struggle

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Newest latest for the good people at Cuepoint is an in-depth look at the story behind Snap! and ‘The Power,’ covering Chill Rob G‘s response, how Penny Ford was recruited to add new vocals and an unfortunate incident involving Turbo B and some drag queens in Boston.

Gettin’ Kinda Hectic: Snap! and Chill Rob G’s Epic ‘Power’ Struggle



Download: A Salute To The Rhyme Syndicate

rhyme syndicate

Ice-T’s Rhyme Syndicate was one of the more unusual extended rap crews, with a core membership that included everyone from old school veteran Donald D, ‘Caucasian Sensation’ Everlast, rapper/crooner dude Bronx Style Bob and acid casualty Divine Styler. According to the Syndicate Facebook page, which looks like it’s run by Donald D, the official role call is as follows:

Ice-T, Donald-D, Everlast, Afrika Islam, Darlene the Syndicate Queen, Bronx Style Bob, Divine Styler & the Scheme Team, Bilal Bashir, Low Profile (W.C. & Aladdin), Spinmasters (Hen-Gee & Evil-E), Hijack, Randy Mac, DJ Chilly Dee, MC Taste, Shaquel Shabazz, Nat the Cat, Domination, T.D.F., Mixmaster Quick, F.B.I. Crew, Lord Finesse, Nile Kings, Rhamel, Tre Kan, Bang-O, Toddy Tee, Monie Love, MC Trouble and Body Count.

Here’s a collection of my favorite Syndicate songs from that era, a reminder of when LA rappers were still trying to impress New York by rapping properly and when important issues such as how great it would be to have a sweet new Rolex watch were addressed with the seriousness they deserved. Sadly, despite having some great production from Aladdin and SLJ, Ice’s rapping had begun to fall into steep decline by the time he made Home Invasion, where he introduced some teenage chick rapper named Grip. I blame Body Count, obviously.

Download: A Salute To The Rhyme Syndicate

Track listing:
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Black Rob – The Unkut Interview, Volume Two
Monday April 13th 2015,
Filed under: Harlem Nights,Interviews,Not Your Average,Uptown Kicking It
Written by:

BlackRob

Back in 2013, I got to chat to Black Rob for ten minutes as he was on his way to the studio. This time around I tried not to repeat the same questions, but unfortunately I caught him as he was trying to catch some food. Guess some things just aren’t meant to work out, huh? Regardless, you can catch Black Rob’s new LP, Genuine Article, is out 21 April.

Robbie: Were Spoonie Gee and Doug E. Fresh a big influence on you when you were a kid?

Black Rob: Hell yeah! Parties, break-outs – the whole shit! Doug E. Fresh was definitely slamming, man. I already wanted to my thing, but it gave me some inspiration to tbe best that I could be.

What was it like growing in Harlem?

It was different, man. A lotta kids was doing what they had to do, playing around and not doing music, so I came in there doing music. I used to have the parties jumping, little freestyles and all that stuff. Hear that shit out the window. I used to be the number one guy, but I was too young to really comprehend what I was going through, cos I was just stretching out. But I was nice though! [laughs]
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The Missing Ingredients – When Good Rap Chemistry Gets Abandoned
Thursday April 02nd 2015,
Filed under: Features,Not Your Average,Unkut Originals
Written by:

ChemcraftSet

You know those times when groups are greater than the sum of their parts? Here are some examples of rappers and producers who, despite their talents, were less effective on their own.

CL Smooth without Pete Rock

Corey has always been technically strong but without Peter it was hard to care about what he was saying.

GURU without DJ Premier

Keithy EE and Premo had an unbeatable chemistry. The Jazzmatazz albums were a good idea on paper but hardly thrilling to listen to.

Jeru The Damaja without DJ Premier

The Sun Rises In The East was a pretty great album, and the follow-up wasn’t half bad either. Good luck naming a single thing Jeru did once he and Chris Martin stopped hanging out.
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How might rap have evolved without the record business?
Thursday March 26th 2015,
Filed under: Bronx Bombers,Features,Not Your Average,The 80's Files
Written by:

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After transcribing my video interview with Tuff City founder Aaron Fuchs recently, I came across this intriguing quote:

Aaron Fuchs: The Bronx and Harlem were worlds apart cultural by the time the 70’s happened, because Harlem’s a community and The Bronx was burnt-out, but they were geographically very close to each other. You had hip-hop evolve like a weed, like top seed and bang! The Harlem record guys take over. You had Spoonie Gee, who was really an R&B guy who was rapping instead of singing. You had this truncating of what hip-hop was into the constraints of the Harlem record business. These couple of [Cold Crush Brothers] records actually reflect what hip-hop was before it was a record business. This crazy, formless, sprawling kind of music. You wonder sometimes would would have happened to hip-hop had The Bronx had not been so close to Harlem and was so quickly engulfed by the vastly deeper traditions of Harlem.

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Rap Albums To Get Stuck On A Desert Island With [2000-2015 Edition]

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If, by some tragic turn of fate, all rap released prior to the year 2000 was somehow obliterated from the face of the earth and you were given the opportunity to take twenty CD’s to pass the time while I wasted away in exile on some deserted island (stay with me here), then what would you take? I considered the options this afternoon and devised the following list of hip-hop platters to bring along.
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Grand Daddy I.U. feat. Shawn Haynes – My Neck Of The Woods
Friday March 06th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

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R.I.P. Easy Rick. Taken from the Paper Is My Priority LP.



Flavor Flav – Party In My Pants [Early 80’s demo]
Wednesday February 18th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

Flavor Flav

A few months ago Random Rap Radio dug up an early MC DJ Flavor tape from the Spectrum City era when Terminator X was still calling himself DJ Mellow Dee. The hook for this record is nothing short of incredible.



No Country For Old (Rap) Men: Predicting Future Kanye West Collaborations With Aging Rockers
Friday February 06th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

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Following Sir Paul’s awkward connect with Ye and RiRi,  I predict some future uncomfortable collaborations.

No Country For Old (Rap) Men: Predicting Future Kanye West Collaborations With Aging Rockers



Your Old Droog – Gentrify My Hood
Wednesday February 04th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

the-most-gentrified-cities-in-america

Finally, we have an entry into the Gentrification Rap genre! Interesting to note that Droog seems to share the same singing voice as the little homey as well. Produced by DJ Skizz, from the Kinison EP.



Video: Psycho Les feat. Royal Flush, Tragedy Khadafi and Illa Gee – Thunder Bells
Tuesday February 03rd 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

Here’s the official video for this dope track from last year, which previously had a behind the scenes clip that was removed since it wasn’t the proper clip.



Non-Rapper Dudes Series: Freddy Fresh Interview
Thursday January 29th 2015,
Filed under: Crates,Features,Non-Rapper Dudes,Not Your Average
Written by:

freddy-fresh

This morning I had a quick chat with DJ, producer and record collector Freddy Fresh about B-Boy Records, Breakbeat Lenny, The Rap Records book and the correct storage of 45’s. Freddy’s latest album, Play The Music, is out this March.

Robbie: How did you get involved in remixing a track for BDP’s Man and His Music album?

Freddy Fresh: That was ‘88. My first recorded work was that remix with one button pause switching and broken turntables. That was me hanging out at the offices in the South Bronx of B-Boy Records. The plaque on the Criminal Minded album – there’s a plaque between Kris and Scott – I made that plaque. If you look at the back of the album it says, ‘Freddy Fresh, thanks for the plaque.’ I got name-checked on a lot of those albums – Public Enemy thanked me, MC Lyte, Audio Two – all those guys said ‘thanks Freddy Fresh’ on their album, because I was engraving name plates and sending them out to my favorite hip-hop artists in the Bronx and Brooklyn and stuff in 1985, 6 and 7.
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Ten Examples of Kid Rap That Aren’t Embarrassing
Tuesday January 20th 2015,
Filed under: Features,Listicles,Not Your Average,The Unkut Guide,Where Are They Now?
Written by:

CHI_EDIT

Kid Rap became a fad in the early 90’s, but youngsters rapping has been going on since the beginning of hip-hop. Matter of fact, some of them had more to offer than shaved heads and shouted choruses. Tragedy and LL were sonning their peers back when they were 14 and 16, respectively. Meanwhile, Jeff from the De La Soul skits never made an album while those Quo clowns got Redman and Aaron Hall features on their album. Where’s the justice?
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