Black Rob – The Unkut Interview, Volume Two
Monday April 13th 2015,
Filed under: Harlem Nights,Interviews,Not Your Average,Uptown Kicking It
Written by:


Back in 2013, I got to chat to Black Rob for ten minutes as he was on his way to the studio. This time around I tried not to repeat the same questions, but unfortunately I caught him as he was trying to catch some food. Guess some things just aren’t meant to work out, huh? Regardless, you can catch Black Rob’s new LP, Genuine Article, is out 21 April.

Robbie: Were Spoonie Gee and Doug E. Fresh a big influence on you when you were a kid?

Black Rob: Hell yeah! Parties, break-outs – the whole shit! Doug E. Fresh was definitely slamming, man. I already wanted to my thing, but it gave me some inspiration to tbe best that I could be.

What was it like growing in Harlem?

It was different, man. A lotta kids was doing what they had to do, playing around and not doing music, so I came in there doing music. I used to have the parties jumping, little freestyles and all that stuff. Hear that shit out the window. I used to be the number one guy, but I was too young to really comprehend what I was going through, cos I was just stretching out. But I was nice though! [laughs]

The Missing Ingredients – When Good Rap Chemistry Gets Abandoned
Thursday April 02nd 2015,
Filed under: Features,Not Your Average,Unkut Originals
Written by:


You know those times when groups are greater than the sum of their parts? Here are some examples of rappers and producers who, despite their talents, were less effective on their own.

CL Smooth without Pete Rock

Corey has always been technically strong but without Peter it was hard to care about what he was saying.

GURU without DJ Premier

Keithy EE and Premo had an unbeatable chemistry. The Jazzmatazz albums were a good idea on paper but hardly thrilling to listen to.

Jeru The Damaja without DJ Premier

The Sun Rises In The East was a pretty great album, and the follow-up wasn’t half bad either. Good luck naming a single thing Jeru did once he and Chris Martin stopped hanging out.

How might rap have evolved without the record business?
Thursday March 26th 2015,
Filed under: Bronx Bombers,Features,Not Your Average,The 80's Files
Written by:


After transcribing my video interview with Tuff City founder Aaron Fuchs recently, I came across this intriguing quote:

Aaron Fuchs: The Bronx and Harlem were worlds apart cultural by the time the 70’s happened, because Harlem’s a community and The Bronx was burnt-out, but they were geographically very close to each other. You had hip-hop evolve like a weed, like top seed and bang! The Harlem record guys take over. You had Spoonie Gee, who was really an R&B guy who was rapping instead of singing. You had this truncating of what hip-hop was into the constraints of the Harlem record business. These couple of [Cold Crush Brothers] records actually reflect what hip-hop was before it was a record business. This crazy, formless, sprawling kind of music. You wonder sometimes would would have happened to hip-hop had The Bronx had not been so close to Harlem and was so quickly engulfed by the vastly deeper traditions of Harlem.


Rap Albums To Get Stuck On A Desert Island With [2000-2015 Edition]


If, by some tragic turn of fate, all rap released prior to the year 2000 was somehow obliterated from the face of the earth and you were given the opportunity to take twenty CD’s to pass the time while I wasted away in exile on some deserted island (stay with me here), then what would you take? I considered the options this afternoon and devised the following list of hip-hop platters to bring along.

Grand Daddy I.U. feat. Shawn Haynes – My Neck Of The Woods
Friday March 06th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:


R.I.P. Easy Rick. Taken from the Paper Is My Priority LP.

Flavor Flav – Party In My Pants [Early 80’s demo]
Wednesday February 18th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

Flavor Flav

A few months ago Random Rap Radio dug up an early MC DJ Flavor tape from the Spectrum City era when Terminator X was still calling himself DJ Mellow Dee. The hook for this record is nothing short of incredible.

No Country For Old (Rap) Men: Predicting Future Kanye West Collaborations With Aging Rockers
Friday February 06th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:


Following Sir Paul’s awkward connect with Ye and RiRi,  I predict some future uncomfortable collaborations.

No Country For Old (Rap) Men: Predicting Future Kanye West Collaborations With Aging Rockers

Your Old Droog – Gentrify My Hood
Wednesday February 04th 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:


Finally, we have an entry into the Gentrification Rap genre! Interesting to note that Droog seems to share the same singing voice as the little homey as well. Produced by DJ Skizz, from the Kinison EP.

Video: Psycho Les feat. Royal Flush, Tragedy Khadafi and Illa Gee – Thunder Bells
Tuesday February 03rd 2015,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

Here’s the official video for this dope track from last year, which previously had a behind the scenes clip that was removed since it wasn’t the proper clip.

Non-Rapper Dudes Series: Freddy Fresh Interview
Thursday January 29th 2015,
Filed under: Crates,Features,Non-Rapper Dudes,Not Your Average
Written by:


This morning I had a quick chat with DJ, producer and record collector Freddy Fresh about B-Boy Records, Breakbeat Lenny, The Rap Records book and the correct storage of 45’s. Freddy’s latest album, Play The Music, is out this March.

Robbie: How did you get involved in remixing a track for BDP’s Man and His Music album?

Freddy Fresh: That was ‘88. My first recorded work was that remix with one button pause switching and broken turntables. That was me hanging out at the offices in the South Bronx of B-Boy Records. The plaque on the Criminal Minded album – there’s a plaque between Kris and Scott – I made that plaque. If you look at the back of the album it says, ‘Freddy Fresh, thanks for the plaque.’ I got name-checked on a lot of those albums – Public Enemy thanked me, MC Lyte, Audio Two – all those guys said ‘thanks Freddy Fresh’ on their album, because I was engraving name plates and sending them out to my favorite hip-hop artists in the Bronx and Brooklyn and stuff in 1985, 6 and 7.

Ten Examples of Kid Rap That Aren’t Embarrassing
Tuesday January 20th 2015,
Filed under: Features,Listicles,Not Your Average,The Unkut Guide,Where Are They Now?
Written by:


Kid Rap became a fad in the early 90’s, but youngsters rapping has been going on since the beginning of hip-hop. Matter of fact, some of them had more to offer than shaved heads and shouted choruses. Tragedy and LL were sonning their peers back when they were 14 and 16, respectively. Meanwhile, Jeff from the De La Soul skits never made an album while those Quo clowns got Redman and Aaron Hall features on their album. Where’s the justice?

Ten Rap Remixes That Are Barely Remixes But Still Win


The following are a collection of remixes that where perhaps only an extra horn, new drums or a rearrangement of the samples differentiates them from the original version, but they’re still significantly better. You could add most of the 80’s Cold Chillin’ 12: mixes to this list, natch.

Brand Nubian – Slow Down [Pete Rock Remix]

Pete Rock & CL Smooth – ‘Straighten It Out’ [remix]

EPMD – ‘Crossover’ [Test Pressing Remix]

Stezo – ‘Freak The Funk’ [12″ Version]

Agallah The Don & Hus Kingpin – Gangsta 2K15


This is the best rap song of 2015 so far.

Download: The Unkut 40 Oz. 2014
Monday December 29th 2014,
Filed under: Compilations,Features,Free Ninety-Nine,Not Your Average,Unkut Originals
Written by:


These are the best 40 rap songs of 2014, according to the Conservative Rap Coalition. Please mail all complaints to the usual address.

Download: The Unkut 40 Oz. 2014

Track listing:


CJ Moore [Black By Demand] – The Unkut Interview, Part Three
Wednesday December 24th 2014,
Filed under: Features,Interviews,Killa Queens,Not Your Average,The 80's Files
Written by:

Black By Demand -– Can't Get Enough-All Rappers Give Up

Concluding the three part interview with Black By Demand front man CJ Moore, he covers working with Paul C, Ultramagnetic MC’s and Super Lover Cee, the importance of engineering and chopping, getting ripped off on the ‘Rump Shaker’ single and his deep crates of unreleased material.

Robbie: What was your involvement with Super Lover Cee and Cassanova Rudd?

Super Lover Cee lived in the building behind mine. He has a group called Future Four MC’s, which was Super Lover Cee, myself, DJ Rudd and there was another DJ named Tiny Tim. We did shows around the neighbourhoods and then we disbanded. I was the guy doing the beats and the choruses and putting the track together. When I did ‘All Rapper’s Give Up,’ I had not gotten a deal just yet. He was hanging out of his window, cos he lived on the first floor, he was playing some stuff and he said, ‘Yo C, listen to this!’ I’m standing by his window and I said, ‘Let’s put it together.’ He wound up putting it together and I wound up tightening it up. When I brought him to the studio to do the session and introduced him to Paul and Mick, Paul C. didn’t want to do the session. He couldn’t hear it, he didn’t see anything pleasurable about it. He wound up doing it. As far as the entirety of the project, when he did their album Girls I Got ‘Em Locked, I did not do any of those records. But a lotta those routines we had in the Future Four? He wound up using them.

Video: Tragedy Khadafi feat. Lil’ Fame – Stand Up [Boiler Room Performance]
Tuesday December 23rd 2014,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:

Not sure where this was filmed. Is this a bar or a lounge room? Why is there a Tekken 3 machine in the background? Nevertheless, I approve of this song.

Stream: New Omniscence and K-Hill EP’s
Tuesday December 23rd 2014,
Filed under: EP's,Not Your Average,Steady Bootleggin',Streaming-Only
Written by:

GRR December covers

A couple of new releases from Debonair P‘s Gentleman’s Relief Records, featuring the talents of Omniscence and K-Hill, who were featured on the Counterstrike 2 album. Check the snippets below and order the vinyl, tape or digital versions here.

CJ Moore [Black By Demand] – The Unkut Interview, Part Two
Tuesday December 16th 2014,
Filed under: Features,Interviews,Not Your Average,Rap Veterans
Written by:


Engineer all-star CJ Moore delves into the behind the scenes events of Kool G Rap‘s Roots of Evil and the infamous Rawkus album, heading out west, working with the Live Squad and much more in the second part of this interview trilogy.

Robbie: What happened after the Akinyele sessions finished?

CJ Moore: When money started coming into play between Dr. Butcher and myself, things started getting funny. I went out to California and I teamed-up with Ed Strickland again and we was with a guy doing a project called The Reality Check – a guy named Michael HarrisHarry O. He’s the guy who funded Death Row Records. Ice Cube, Ice-T, Dub C, all those guys were involved. I produced a couple of records with Ice-T with me and him rapping back and forth. I was doing the east coast stuff, Battlecat was doing the west coast stuff. I went to Big Daddy Kane, talked to him on the phone, I said, ‘I need you to be out in California. I’m doing this project, it’s kinda merging the east coast with the west coast. Let’s talk about what it’s gonna take to get you on the project.’ He asked me who was on the project, and I explained to him. There was guy named Black Ceasar on the project, he was from Pittsburgh, real talented guy, but Kane had a problem because his name was Black Ceasar. I said, ‘But your name is Big Daddy Kane!’ ‘Yeah, aka Black Ceasar.’ I said, ‘What kind of bullshit is that?’ He couldn’t do the project because of that. I stepped to Method Man and I was trying to get to Redman and everyone was kinda busy, so the east coast/west coast thing never did the proper merge. There was so much money on the table, more than these guys have ever made. For some reason it just backed-out. I guess the whole Harry O thing might have scared people to a degree, if you know the homework on the whole Death Row situation. But we can’t get into that.


Face-Off: Grandmaster Caz vs. Biz Markie – A Thing Named Kim
Thursday December 04th 2014,
Filed under: Face Off,Jokes On You,Not Your Average,Vote Or Die
Written by:

Lil' Kim 2014

Biz Markie apparently makes up all his rhymes on the spot in the studio and then learns them later – except for when he gets his pals to write songs for him. Big Daddy Kane wrote the first side of Goin’ Off, as was clearly stated on the back cover (therefore not a case of ‘ghostwriting’) and for his next LP he enlisted GMC to lend his storytelling prowess for this entertainly tasteless tale of transgender luh gone wrong.

Seeing as though Caz’s original reference track was eventually issued with a 45 King remix, we can now compare the two. Who rocked it better?

Download: Ultramagnetic MC’s – Destroying All Germs LP [Unkut Bootleg]


This is the ultimate rap addict dedication – the fantasy league lost Ultramagnetic album that we might have enjoyed if they’d released a follow-up to Critical Beatdown in 1990. Sure, it’s a collection of b-sides and vaulted tracks from between 1987 and 1990, but this sums up everything that makes Ultramagnetic MC’s the greatest rap crew of all time. All praise due to Ced-Gee, Kool Keith, Moe Love and TR Love – the best to ever do it. Shout out to James aka BadNewz of 100X Posse for dropping that ‘MC Champion’ verse.

Download: Ultramagnetic MC’s – Destroying All Germs LP [Unkut Bootleg]

The Source Scans: The Great White Hoax
Tuesday November 18th 2014,
Filed under: Cracker Rap,Magazine Vaults,Not Your Average,The 90's Files
Written by:



Classic material from The Source as Reginald C. Dennis breaks down the 1991 White Rap Invasion. Please note that Lavar kid is a Conservative Rap Coalition pioneer with his sensible haircut and crisp polo shirt.

Stream: Ghostface Killah – 36 Seasons Snippet Mix
Friday November 14th 2014,
Filed under: Not Your Average
Written by:


DJ 7L has put together a sampler of material from the new Ghostface album over production from The Revelations, Lil’ Fame and The 45 King, with a numver of guest spots from AZ and Kool G Rap. You can pre-order the exclusive Get On Down deluxe edition here.

LL Cool J – Soul Survivor [Unreleased Original Version]


After speaking to Dr. Butcher again the other week, he revealed that he’d located a copy of the song he produced for LL Cool J in 1993, which went on to be remixed by QDIII and included on his fifth album, and generously agreed to allow me to share it with the world.

Dr. Butcher: I produced a song called ‘The Soul Survivor’ for him on the 14 Shots To The Dome album, with C4. Me and C4 – the guy who did [Akinyele’s] ‘Put It In Your Mouth’ – were production partners. I was going to C4’s house one day to work on some music, and LL was shooting his first video from that album on Farmer’s Boulevard, and C4 lived on Farmers Boulevard at the time. I got off the bus and saw him and I was like, ‘Yo! What’s up!’ We was always real cool, whenever he had time he would always come see me, but he had been so busy we hadn’t seen each other in a while. So he’s asking, ‘Where you going?’ and I’m like ‘To my production partner’s house right down the street’. When we originally did the track, we sampled JDL from the Cold Crush Brothers saying, ‘The L baby, baby, the L baby, baby!’That was the first song I ever produced, I didn’t know how to use machines at the time. We had just got an Ensoniq and was learning what to do. It was rough around the edges. As soon as he heard the track he just sat down, got a pen and pad and wrote the song right on the spot. He was like, ‘Yo, we’re goin’ to the studio tomorrow, gimme your information.’ So I had to go get attorney’s and set-up publishing companies and we were in the studio the next day, recording. It happened that fast.

Record Labels Are Stupid
Friday October 31st 2014,
Filed under: Features,Not Your Average,Shit I Don't Like
Written by:


Remember how the music industry decided that vinyl was more trouble than it was worth and that the profit margins on tapes and CD’s were far more lucrative so they began cramming 70 minute albums onto one LP? The thing that really grinds my gears is that even when they did bother to press double vinyl, they would often neglect to include the best songs. Here are some notable examples:

Rap Sequels That Win
Friday October 31st 2014,
Filed under: Features,Listicles,Not Your Average
Written by:

godfather 2

In response to this Work of Mart, here are some more follow-ups that are worthy of the originals. Please send all complaints to the usual address.