Stream: Lord Tariq – Uptown Suite Tape

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New Ray West/LUVNY tape with the two tracks featuring Lord Tariq. Available digitally from Bandcamp or on blue plastic.



Video: Hostyle – Who Am I
Tuesday July 21st 2015,
Filed under: Killa Queens,Rap Veterans,Screwball Week
Written by:

Just got put onto this by the homie Konny Kon. Produced by QB Rap P, it’s sounds as if the One-Eyed Maniac may have suffered a minor stroke since I don’t recall him having a speech impediment last time he rapped. Or maybe he just drank a lot before he recorded this. Either way, it’s great to hear from the former Screwball soldier again.



Video: Ghostface Claps Back At Action Bronson
Monday July 20th 2015,
Filed under: Rap Veterans,Video Clips,Wu-Tang Is For The Children
Written by:

Ouch. Let’s give them four minutes each over ‘Impeach’ to settle this.



Video: Chill Rob G ft. R.A. The Rugged Man – Tell ‘Em
Wednesday July 15th 2015,
Filed under: Jersey? Sure!,Rap Veterans
Written by:

This new Chill Rob G track dropped last month. The four track EP is available on vinyl here. You can hear the rest of the release and get a digital version this way. Thoughts on Chill Rob’s new flow?



Video: Diamond D feat. Scram Jones – I Ain’t The One To Fuc Wit
Thursday July 09th 2015,
Filed under: Bronx Bombers,Rap Veterans,Video Clips
Written by:

Video number nine from The Diam Piece.



Capone-N-Noreaga feat. Tragedy Khadafi – Even If

Vic

The War Report crew bring back Grandmaster Vic for some of that Queens blend tape magic.



Video: Grand Daddy I.U – My Neck of the Woods
Tuesday June 16th 2015,
Filed under: Rap Veterans,Strong Island,Video Clips
Written by:

P.I.M.P is available now.



A Tribute To Pumpkinhead

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Pumpkinhead and Sucio Smash [Photo by: Photo Rob]

As most of you already know, long-time indy rap champion Pumpkinhead passed away this week at only 39 years old, tragically leaving behind his pregnant wife and two kids. I’m not really qualified to speak on the man’s numerous contributions, but Chaz Kangas has put together a fitting tribute to the man for Complex, while some of his friends shared their fondest memories on Facebook:

DJ Eclipse: Some of us spend countless hours, days, months, years and even decades promoting others more so then we do ourselves. PH was one of those guys. Even though he made a name for himself in the battle scene and even made some records, it was his work here in NYC that I’ll remember even more. An integral part of the 90’s indie movement as well as today’s battle scene and a promoter of authentic acts and events, PH cared about the culture of Hip Hop. For him it was about your skills and how to improve on them. He was one of the ones that helped keep the foundation strong for others to go on and build careers.
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Download: Mobb Deep – Soundtrack and Compilation Cuts

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Twelve non-LP Mobb Deep tracks that were officially released on someone else’s album, as opposed to the seemingly endless supply of stuff that never got a proper retail release.

UPDATE: By popular demand, now available as a Zippyshare Records and Tapes download…

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No Country For Old (Rap) Men: The Selective Memory of Rap Fans

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A.K.A. Where were the celebrations and think-pieces for the twentieth anniversary of To The East, Blackwards?

No Country For Old (Rap) Men: The Selective Memory of Rap Fans



Video: TheBeeShine Cypher #6 – T La Rock, Silver Fox and Kool DJ Red Alert
Thursday May 28th 2015,
Filed under: Bronx Bombers,Harlem Nights,Old Moufs,Rap Veterans,Video Clips
Written by:

Great to see Terry and Fox in action again with Uncle Red on the decks.



Guru – The Modern Fix Interview
Friday April 17th 2015,
Filed under: Beantown,Interviews,Rap Veterans,Rest In Peace
Written by:

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Editor’s note: The following interview was conducted by Bill Zimmerman in 2007 for the now defunct print edition of Modern Fix magazine prior to the release of Guru’s Jazzmatazz, Vol. 4: The Hip Hop Jazz Messenger. This Sunday marks the fifth anniversary of Guru’s passing.

On April 19, 2010, the rapper born Keith Elam died of complications from cancer at 48. Hip-hop lost one of its Golden Era notables. What remained were questions about Guru’s association with Solar, his late-career producer and business partner in the label 7 Grand, whose motives were questioned by the rapper’s family and former collaborators. Shortly after Guru’s death, Solar released a letter purportedly written by Guru and critical of Premier. Guru’s family labeled it a fake; Solar defended the letter as “what Guru wanted.”

The self-proclaimed “king of monotone,” Guru possessed one of the most unmistakable voices in hip-hop. Honest and authoritative, he delivered music over three decades, most notably in Gang Starr with DJ Premier as well as through genre-bending Jazzmatazz solo efforts. What follows are excerpts from an unpublished interview with Guru and Solar in 2007. It’s a snapshot of Guru’s late 2000s, post-Gang Starr career. It shows two men focused on making their own lane and taking creative chances in the leadup to what would be Guru’s final Jazzmatazz project. Despite all the drama and confusion that would ensue, Guru made a mark on hip-hop. That’s indisputable.

Bill: Guru, one the previous Jazzmatazz projects you were working with multiple producers. What was it like just sticking with Solar on this one?

Guru: Actually, the only one with multiple producers was the third one (Street Soul). The first one (Vol. 1) I produced, the second one (Vol. 2: The New Reality) I produced and then the third one multiple (producers). Actually, after the third one I said I wanted to go back to working with just one producer because I left like the third one – even though I had like a lot of big name producers – it came out more like a compilation than it did an organic work. It’s still one of my favorites joints, but it was something about the cohesiveness of one producer bringing everything together. After teaming up with Solar – first of all when I first started hearing his music that was after we were friends already for two years. Then we decided to do the label. We were introduced six years ago – he took me to his lab so I could hear some tracks, and it was crazy because it was almost like he read my mind because I was looking for a future sound, a new sound for myself. All my favorite artists are able to do that – to recreate and renew and then reinvent. So, when I heard his tracks, I was like, “Oh, man.” I was blown away and actually took some stuff home right then. Our first release came out in 2005 on 7 Grand. That was called Guru Version 7.0 The Street Scriptures, and that was just the tip of the iceberg. That was just the introduction to this new chemistry. Now, at this point, the chemistry is just more intense, so this album is definitely proof of that.
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Video: Funkmaster Wizard Wiz got beef with The Almighty KG from the Cold Crush Brothers
Thursday April 02nd 2015,
Filed under: Forgotten Beefs,Rap Veterans,Video Clips
Written by:

Almighty KG was meant to visit Wiz in Atlanta but never showed up. This was the result.



Chill Rob G – The Unkut Interview, Volume Two

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While I was staying in New Jersey mid 2013, I attempted to shoot some footage of the original Flavor Unit crew. As it happened, I only managed to get Chill Rob G on film, and after watching the video back I’ve decided that this plays better as a written piece. While some of the same stuff from our 2006 conversation is covered, Rob also went into a lot more detail on some topics, making it a worthwhile piece on it’s own. Not to mention that Ride The Rhythm still stands as one of the strongest and most original releases of 1989.

Robbie: You mentioned that you went through a few different names when you were younger?

Chill Rob G: When I first started I had an identity crisis, I had a bunch of different names. It was Jazzy B, it was Bobby G, it was Killer B – cos my name was Robert. I was down with a couple of different crews too. I was down with The World Rap Crew and I was down with the Dignified Almighty Magnificent MC’sThose D.A.M. MC’s. When all of that fell apart I just kept rapping on my own. I used to practice with my man Michael Ali, be up at his house every single day, making tapes. When I said that on the record it was true!

Were these beats that he’d made?

He tried to make beats but they was [blows raspberry]. I would just rap over popular rap records. He would try to cut the break. He wasn’t really that good a DJ either – but that was my man back then. [laughs] We would make tapes and try to get it out to the drug dealers, cos they’d be out all night. They would play that music and people would get a chance to hear me rap.
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Mixtape: DJ Dee-Ville – All Hail The King Mixtape
Monday March 09th 2015,
Filed under: Mix Tapes,Rap Veterans,Steady Bootleggin',The 80's Files
Written by:

13z1ic0

This is a collection of King Sun winners from a couple of years ago, which is still as relevant as ever.

Track listing:
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Just-Ice – Going Way Back Dub Plate
Friday February 20th 2015,
Filed under: BK All Day,Rap Veterans
Written by:

The Original Gangster of Hip-Hop remade his classic ode to rap history for the Deadly Dragon Sound System last December. I wonder if he’d do a version for the Conservative Rap Coalition if we asked very nicely?



The Booze Hound Files: Grand Daddy I.U.
Wednesday February 04th 2015,
Filed under: Art of Facts,In The Trenches,Rap Veterans,Strong Island,The Booze Hound Files
Written by:

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Here’s a heart-warming tale of drinking too much from Grand Daddy I.U. from the interview I conducted with him in the carpark of a bar in Long Island, circa 2013. Living proof that doctor’s don’t know shit a lot of the time, and that drinking non-alcoholic beer really is a fate worse than death itself.

Robbie: Any good drinking stories?

Grand Daddy I.U.: Back in the days I used to drink Bacardi Dark. I must’ve been an alcoholic, cos I would go to sleep drinking that shit and wake up drinking that shit. One day my stomach was feeling so fuckin’ crazy I thought I had to shit or something. I’m sitting on the toilet and ain’t shit coming out – I start throwing up, throwing up – the shit started becoming yellow! I didn’t eat no shit that was yellow! Come to find out it was my stomach lining. This shit became so painful I called my moms, ‘I don’t know what this shit is, but you gotta come get me!’ She came and got me, the whole time I keep throwing up.
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Grand Daddy I.U. feat. Biz Markie – I Ain’t Got No Money [1992]
Wednesday February 04th 2015,
Filed under: Crates,Rap Veterans,Strong Island
Written by:

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A few years back Grand Daddy I.U. released an EP of his early work (this time with the right production credits) on the appropriately titled Cold Stealin’ label. As a bonus, he included this shelved track he recorded in 1992 with Biz Markie on the hook, which contains gems such as “For that you get a smack, while I’m sticking my one-eyed jack in your ass crack.” The perfect compliment to I.U.’s classic ‘Girl In The Mall.’
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Video: Diamond D feat. Grand Daddy I.U. – The Game
Monday January 26th 2015,
Filed under: Rap Veterans,Strong Island,Video Clips
Written by:

One of the best tracks from The Diam Piece gets a video, directed by Pritt Kalsi.



O.C. – The Unkut Interview
Thursday January 22nd 2015,
Filed under: BK All Day,Features,Interviews,Rap Veterans,Web Work
Written by:

O.C.

Working through my list of D.I.T.C. members to interview (only Fat Joe, Buckwild and O.Gee remaining), I got to talk shop with O.C. recently to ask the question that’s been burning my soul slow since 1994 – why didn’t he use that Rakim sample on ‘Time’s Up’!?

O.C. – The Unkut Interview

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Grand Puba – The More Things Change
Monday January 12th 2015,
Filed under: Rap Veterans,Steady Bootleggin'
Written by:

grandpuba

For anyone who has missed Puba‘s off-key warbling in recent years, you’re in for a treat. I’m just glad he ditched that shitty keyboard he used for Understand This.



The Awful Truth About Rap Shelf Life
Thursday January 08th 2015,
Filed under: Features,Rap Veterans,The 80's Files,The 90's Files,The Unkut Opinion
Written by:

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The limited shelf life of most rap groups is a an unfortunate reality. For some MC’s, the window of opportunity is so small that getting stuck in record label limbo for two or three years can spell career ruin, while even some of the genre’s greatest groups such as Run-DMC and Public Enemy suffered album release delays which saw them slip from cutting-edge to being eclipsed by the new kids on the block (with the exception of Donny Walberg’s ‘posse’).
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Video: Psycho Les – Show Me Thoze!
Monday December 29th 2014,
Filed under: Killa Queens,Newest Latest,Rap Veterans,Video Clips
Written by:

Psycho Les carries on Beatnuts tradition with this dedication to racks.



CJ Moore [Black By Demand] – The Unkut Interview, Part Two
Tuesday December 16th 2014,
Filed under: Features,Interviews,Not Your Average,Rap Veterans
Written by:

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Engineer all-star CJ Moore delves into the behind the scenes events of Kool G Rap‘s Roots of Evil and the infamous Rawkus album, heading out west, working with the Live Squad and much more in the second part of this interview trilogy.

Robbie: What happened after the Akinyele sessions finished?

CJ Moore: When money started coming into play between Dr. Butcher and myself, things started getting funny. I went out to California and I teamed-up with Ed Strickland again and we was with a guy doing a project called The Reality Check – a guy named Michael HarrisHarry O. He’s the guy who funded Death Row Records. Ice Cube, Ice-T, Dub C, all those guys were involved. I produced a couple of records with Ice-T with me and him rapping back and forth. I was doing the east coast stuff, Battlecat was doing the west coast stuff. I went to Big Daddy Kane, talked to him on the phone, I said, ‘I need you to be out in California. I’m doing this project, it’s kinda merging the east coast with the west coast. Let’s talk about what it’s gonna take to get you on the project.’ He asked me who was on the project, and I explained to him. There was guy named Black Ceasar on the project, he was from Pittsburgh, real talented guy, but Kane had a problem because his name was Black Ceasar. I said, ‘But your name is Big Daddy Kane!’ ‘Yeah, aka Black Ceasar.’ I said, ‘What kind of bullshit is that?’ He couldn’t do the project because of that. I stepped to Method Man and I was trying to get to Redman and everyone was kinda busy, so the east coast/west coast thing never did the proper merge. There was so much money on the table, more than these guys have ever made. For some reason it just backed-out. I guess the whole Harry O thing might have scared people to a degree, if you know the homework on the whole Death Row situation. But we can’t get into that.

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Al’ Tariq aka Fashion – The Unkut Interview, Part Two

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Continuing my interview with Kool-Ass Fash, we discuss him leaving The Beatnuts, meeting Kanye West, forming Missin’ Linx, getting beat-jacked by Dr. Dre and his ill-fated experience signing with Dante Ross.

Robbie: At what stage did you decide to do a solo album?

Al’ Tariq: While we were out on tour doing The Beatnuts joint, we were doing a show close to home at a school, maybe in Long Island or some shit, being on stage and then somebody started heckling us. Talking shit, ‘Yo, you fuckin’ aargh!’ I finally look and it’s Juju. Then he comes and hops on stage and joins in on one of our songs and shit. I was so mad, and I could never understand why Les and Peter Kang didn’t get mad with this dude. I had a few serious run-ins with him.
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